Web Site Certificates

If you work a lot with web applications that you use to publish your journal, repository of scholarly publications you probably heard about web security, certificates, eavesdropping.

If you are scholar or member of the board being much more involved in social sciences, arts, culture all those technical terms and theories may be quite confusing for you.

I have got recently message from one faculty member that study political sciences that their site is not accessible due to security certificate issue.  “I use Firefox”, he said and I have got warning message about certificates and it does not allow me to see my site.

Well, in majority of cases such warning message is not necessarily bad nor it does prevent you from seeing your site.  Indeed, it is good to learn more about web site certificates.  A good resource of information is here.

The Firefox team published their own article about web site certificates and relations with Firefox browser.

In additional article about technical error and message “Your connection is not secure”  Firefox team explained possible reasons.

In the case of journal published in the Open Journal Systems there was not issue with the Open Journal Systems web application.  Actually, their certificate expired as on image below:

certificate expired

 

Since they are sure that they trust their site they added exception to their browser.  They contacted their hosting company, checked certificates and solved issue. That is not hard.  Your administrator can keep notes on certificates and remind you on renewals and keep communication with hosting company and/or other certification authority and renew certificates in a timely manner.

 

CrossRef, DOI, XML, easy to do?

Many people from editorial boards asked me various questions about registering their journal with CrossRef. What is DOI? Is that XML thing too complicated?  Do we need someone with PhD to do that?

CrossRef is a not-for-profit membership organization for scholarly publishing working to make content easy to find, cite, link, and assess. We do it in five ways: rallying the community; tagging metadata; running a shared infrastructure; playing with new technology; and making tools and services to improve research communications.  The Digital Object Identifier, DOI is special number assigned uniquely to publications such as article, issue, galley, dataset, book, database etc.  There is interesting Wikipedia article about DOI for those who do not have much time to go into details.

People from CrossRef created a series of training materials which you can find on their Youtube channel.

I found very useful to watch their training on content registration and maintaining metadata information.  You can find a lot of useful information in that video training.  If you prefer slide presentation CrossRef published on Slideshare presentation about the same topic.

I always suggest to those who do not want to spend a lot of time in technical work in process of metadatadeposit and xml formatting to use the Open Journal Systems.

It is very easy to use Open Journal Systems and assign DOI numbers. Easy to use interface and pretty automatized process of metadata deposit save you a lot of time and effort.   There is special plugin for DOI assignment to your articles or other article/publication components. The users of 2.4.x branch of OJS can find information on assigning DOIs here.

The users of 3.x branch of OJS can do that even easier in less than 2 minutes configuration of plugin.  Huh, you will see that DOI and XML exports are not so hard thing. After using OJS you can ask yourself why you have had a lot of anxiety while thinking on things that are so easy to do.