Manuals for Open Journal Systems

I have found that many editorial boards struggle with a lack of concise instruction materials and a lack of people who can train them with hands-on approach.  They usually find some solutions in on-line forums, but it is time consuming for editorial boards to spend so much time and look for partial information. Sometimes people who write manuals do not explain each step.  Several people contacted me and asked: “What I have to do now?  Something is missing.”

System administrators, software developers assume that what is easy to them it should be easy to everyone.  They plan training to be done in one evening because “It is easy. ” In my experience, I often found out that such practice leads to misconfiguration of application, underuse of its features,  mistakes in performing workflow tasks and procedures.  Work with applications as the Open Journal Systems is not hard but it is complex and it takes some time until user is familiar with its functionality and simple procedures for configuration and efficient use.

I wrote manuals for authors, editorial boards and reviewers for scientific journals according to their needs.

You can find here manual for authors, editorial boards, and reviewers.

I will publish here soon manual that puts together some basic administrative and editorial functions aimed to successful configuration of your Open Journal Systems application for your journal.

 

Licensing – Open Access

In my work with editorial boards of scholarly journals I found often that they support idea of open access in general. But, it is not clear always that licensing itself from the legal point of view may be quite complex.  Heads of scientific libraries and editorial boards sometimes discuss for long time issues related to licensing issues.  Sometimes that takes too much time since their lawyers sometimes say:  “That license gives you framework for implementation of open access ideas, but in our legislation it will be hard to make defense at the court. ” Well, it might be quite useful to have close cooperation with lawyers, NGOs and other people involved in the development of legislative efforts and translate Creative Commons license and do necessary steps so it can be accepted and accepted in legislation in your country.

In some countries people register their work in national copyright agencies, but absence of registration does not imply absence of protection and copyright.

One of successful and viable licensing practices is to choose appropriate Creative Commons licenses for article, data set, images or other article components.  Scientists who would publish source code of software used and created in research may use free software licenses. Please note that license does not relate to the content on images, video in terms of privacy and other potential legal issues.  For example, video showing a woman doing breast self-exam can be from the point of video authoring protected by Creative Commons. But if video shows face of the woman showed in video recording her privacy is violated if she had not given clear consent for that previously.

Editorial boards and librarians should often visit the website of EIFL.  They made very useful Handbook on Copyright and Related Issues for Libraries.  Those who would like to learn more on use of Creative Commons and what users can do with Creative Commons licenses please visit page with information on webinar related to that topic.  Knowledge acquired from those resources can help you to be more efficient, productive and safe in your publishing efforts. Your administrator can insert appropriate licensing information in published content.

The Open Journal Systems can insert licensing information in the article metadata  automatically and save your effort and time.